Commodity

A commodity is food, metal, or another physical substance that investors buy or sell, usually via futures contracts. The New York Times Financial Glossary

* * *

commodity com‧mod‧i‧ty [kəˈmɒdti ǁ kəˈmɑː-] noun commodities PLURALFORM [countable]
1. FINANCE a product that can be sold to make a profit, especially one in its basic form before it has been used or changed in an industrial process. Examples of commodities are farm products and metals:

• The company trades worldwide, buying and selling basic commodities such as timber, coal and cement.

• Rice is the country's principle export commodity.

ˌcyclical comˈmodity FINANCE
a commodity whose price rises and falls by large amounts during periods of fast and slow economic growth
ˌhard comˈmodity FINANCE
materials such as metals, chemicals, and oil that are traded in theCommodities Markets
ˌphysical comˈmodity FINANCE
an actual commodity that is to be delivered, rather than one in financial trading where the trader does not take delivery:

• Most futures contracts are canceled out by opposing trades, so futures traders rarely take delivery of a physical commodity.

ˌsoft comˈmodity FINANCE
goods such as sugar, coffee, cotton, and grains that are traded in theCommodities Markets:

• Soft commodities, in particular coffee, tea, cocoa and cotton are some of the most important commodities in international trade

2. also comˈmodity ˌproduct MARKETING a product or service that is difficult to show as being different from similar products or services offered by competitors:

• PCs have become commodities.

* * *

   A natural raw material used as a foodstuff or in manufacturing. Classified in the following groups:
   - oil and gas
   - metals
   - grains and oilseeds
   - soft commodities such as sugar, cocoa, coffee and tea
   - plantation crops such as rubber and palmoil; cotton and wool. Exchange-traded commodities are quoted in specific lots of a specific quality for specified delivery, and usually also trade in forward, futures and options contracts. Commodities traded outside organized exchanges usually change hands by direct contact between individual producers and individual end-users. The contracts are tailor-made for each deal and are often signed for a long-term continuing supply.

* * *

commodity UK US /kəˈmɒdəti/ noun [C]
STOCK MARKET, FINANCE a substance or a product that can be traded in large quantities, such as oil, metals, grain, coffee, etc.: »

One big commodity that Canada exports is oil.

»

Higher commodities prices boosted first-quarter profits.

»

agricultural commodities

FINANCE a financial product that can be traded: »

Returning barren fields to their natural state as wetlands creates a host of ""wetland mitigation credits,"" a commodity the company plans to sell.

NATURAL RESOURCES a thing or a quality that is useful: »

Water is a very scarce commodity in the region.

»

Fluency in Arabic is a valuable commodity in a job market desperate for Arabic translators.


Financial and business terms. 2012.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • commodity — com·mod·i·ty /kə mä də tē/ n pl ties: a class of economic goods; esp: an item of merchandise (as soybeans) whose price is the basis of futures trading Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. commodity …   Law dictionary

  • Commodity — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Artículo principal: Commodity en inglés Una commodity, en inglés el término original, es un bien o servicio para el que existe demanda, pero que es provisto sin gran aportación de valor por el mercado. Se trata de un …   Wikipedia Español

  • Commodity — Com*mod i*ty, n.; pl. {Commodities}. [F. commodit[ e], fr. L. commoditas. See {Commode}.] 1. Convenience; accommodation; profit; benefit; advantage; interest; commodiousness. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Drawn by the commodity of a footpath. B. Jonson.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • commodity — early 15c., benefit, profit, welfare; later a convenient or useful product, from M.Fr. commodité benefit, profit, from L. commoditatem (nom. commoditas) fitness, adaptation, convenience, advantage, from commodus suitable, convenient (see COMMODE… …   Etymology dictionary

  • commodity — /koˈmɔditi, ingl. kəˈmHdɪtɪ/ [vc. ingl., propr. «comodità, cosa utile»] s. f. inv. (econ.) materia prima, bene primario …   Sinonimi e Contrari. Terza edizione

  • commodity — [n] merchandise, possession article, asset, belonging, chattel, goods, line, material, object, produce, product, property, specialty, stock, thing, vendible, ware; concepts 338,710 …   New thesaurus

  • commodity — ► NOUN (pl. commodities) 1) a raw material or agricultural product that can be bought and sold. 2) something useful or valuable. ORIGIN Latin commoditas, from commodus convenient …   English terms dictionary

  • commodity — [kə mäd′ə tē] n. pl. commodities [ME & OFr commodite, benefit, profit < L commoditas, fitness, adaptation < commodus: see COMMODE] 1. any useful thing 2. anything bought and sold; any article of commerce 3. [pl.] basic items or staple… …   English World dictionary

  • Commodity — Wares redirects here. For the online distribution of copyrighted goods, see Warez …   Wikipedia

  • commodity — 01. Basic [commodities] such as rice and corn are heavily subsidized by the government. 02. The stocks were once a much desired [commodity], but have since lost over 70% of their original value. 03. In the desert, ice is an invaluable [commodity] …   Grammatical examples in English

  • Commodity —    According to Karl Marx, the commodity is the cornerstone of capitalism and commodity production is a key defining characteristic of capitalism. Marx begins his investigation of capitalism in Capital with an analysis of the commodity. A… …   Historical dictionary of Marxism

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.